Round Tables

Title

Title

Convenor

RT 01
Abstract
More than one conflict constellation in current Africa’s sub-regions underlines the complexity of regional dynamics: Short-term regional security interests by different actors as well as underlying political economic constellations overlap and can even hinder peace processes in national contexts. At the same time, new ad hoc coalitions such as the G5 Sahel highlight insufficiencies and challenges of existing mechanisms by the regional economic communities (RECs) and the African Union (AU) to provide for a sound basis for collective security. However, they may also undermine the legitimacy and efficiency of the African Peace and Security Architecture (APSA), which has been uphold as the main reference for peace and security on the continent – both from African countries and international donors. Building on a brief problem analysis in the Sahel region and highlighting the root causes and recent conflict dynamics, the roundtable aims to discuss the advantages and perspectives of G5 Sahel as a new sub-regional ad hoc arrangement as well as its impact and (positive/negative) side effects on already existing collective security arrangements by the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) or within the APSA.

Time: Thursday, 28 June 2018, 2 - 4 pm
New Venue: Seminargebäude, S 420

Chair
Holger Grimm (Peace and Security Centre of Competence Sub-Saharan Africa, Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung, Dakar, Senegal)

Discussants
Amandine Gnanguenon (University of Auvergne, Clermont Ferrand, France)
Charles Ukeje (Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria)
Wafula Okumu (The Borders Institute (TBI), Nairobi, Kenya)

Bodo Schulze & Elisabeth Braune (Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung, Berlin)
RT 02
Abstract
Germany’s presidency of the G-20 in 2017 introduced a new initiative for supporting African countries’ development: the G-20 Compact with Africa (CWA). In its resolution, the G20 has acknowledged its special responsibility to join forces in tackling the challenges facing the world’s poorest countries. The CWA brings together interested African countries with the World Bank Group, the International Monetary Fund, the African Development Bank, and other multilateral and bilateral partners to develop and support policies and actions that are essential for attracting private investment. Ten countries have signed up for the initiative and outlined their reform programmes under a framework adopted by the G-20 in July 2017 in Hamburg. The compact reflects the reality that public resources are scarce and only private sector-led growth can create enough jobs for the young.
The compact differs from past initiatives by focusing explicitly on facilitating private investment. There are three major CWA frameworks: The macroeconomic framework formulates a set of well-known recommendations: fiscal discipline, redirection of public expenditure, tax reform, financial liberalization, elimination of barriers to foreign direct investment, privatization of state-owned enterprises, deregulation of market entry and competition, and secure property rights. The business framework primarily addresses regulatory uncertainties. The financing framework is centred on de-risking instruments to stimulate infrastructure investment by pension funds and life insurance companies.
What would an eventual success of the CWA look like? Four ingredients are of major relevance:
• Compact countries continue to pursue sound macroeconomic policies and invest in state capacity and good governance.
• Countries and their partners invest in deeper diagnostics of private sector constraints, including through a systematic, sustained, and open dialogue with domestic and foreign private actors to pinpoint additional reforms that further reduce country risks.
• G-20 governments encourage close engagement of G-20 private sector actors with – CWA countries to help transform risk perceptions and identify new investment opportunities.
• International financial institutions support new investments with their instruments where risks remain too elevated.
The CWA can bring change. The G-20 has recognized that African governments themselves hold the key to breaking investor wariness of the continent. The G-20 accepts that Africa will be led out of poverty by those governments that pioneer change. The CWAs will help the most ambitious governments to lead the way.
This panel discusses whether the CWA is an instrument that will bring change and tackle the most severe problems in Africa: Infrastructural bottlenecks and processes of structural transformation leading to lower poverty and unemployment.

Time: Saturday, 30/06/2018, 11 am - 1 pm
Venue: Hörsaalgebäude, HS 7

Chair
Robert Kappel (Leipzig University)

Discussants
Adebayo Olukoshi (International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance, IDEA, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia)
Andrea Ostheimer (Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung, Berlin)

Robert Kappel (Leipzig University)
RT 03
Abstract
Ziel dieses Panels ist, die wichtigsten jüngsten Entwicklungen der Informationsinfrastruktur vorzustellen. Das Auffinden wissenschaftlicher Materialien gezielt für die Afrikaforschung wird zunehmend erleichtert, da das gesamte Material verschiedener Datenbanken in einem Suchportal zugänglich gemacht werden soll. Durch internationale Kooperationen und Digitalisierungsprojekte wird der Zugang zu Materialien ständig verbessert. Gleichwohl sind vielen Afrikawissenschaftler_innen etliche Rechercheangebote nicht bekannt oder sie nutzen sie nicht. Wie können sie besser erreicht werden? Gerade für den Aufbau weiterer Datenbanken und die Aktualisierung vorhandener Forschungsinfrastrukturen wäre aber der Input von Forschenden und Lehrenden wichtig, der jedoch oft Zeit benötigt, die im Lehr- und Forschungsalltag oft nicht vorhanden ist. Manche Datenbanken sind nicht frei zugänglich und ihr Zugang damit an die Mitgliedschaft an bestimmten Universitäten gebunden. Wie kann eine stärkere internationale Vernetzung der Forschungsinfrastrukturen aussehen? Welche Möglichkeiten, Hindernisse und ethischen Fragen ergeben sich durch die Bereitstellung digitalisierter Materialien, besonders Forschungsdaten? Diese und weitere Fragen sollen auf dem Panel des Infrastrukturausschusses der VAD diskutiert werden.

Time: Friday, 29 June 2018, 4.30 - 6.30 pm
New Venue: Seminargebäude, S 420

Chair
Aïsha Othman (VAD Infrastructure Committee, Frankfurt)

Discussants
Susann Baller/Mareike König (German Historical Institute, Paris, France)
Hauke Dorsch (University of Mainz)
Alice Spinnler/David Tréfás (University of Basel, Switzerland)
Ulf Vierke (University of Bayreuth)

Aïsha Othman (VAD Infrastructure Committee, Frankfurt)
RT 04
Abstract
Despite beacons of hope that occurred over the last two years in the form of peaceful changes of government in Nigeria and Ghana, African democracies overall remain fragile. In certain cases, it is not only about the fragility of democracy and the lack of a democratic political culture. For observers looking beyond the paradigm of electoral democracies it is the regression and backward orientation of democratization processes – processes which once set off with a lot of hope and enthusiasm. 25 years after the third wave hit the shores of the African continent we increasingly find political systems legitimized by elections of dubious quality. Façade democracies have been created and the international community closed its eyes to it for far too long. In the age of digitalization, electoral fraud does not take place anymore on election day and in polling stations. It happens either long before while compiling the voters register or during the processing of data. Not in many African states, judicial power is as independent and courageous as it has been in Kenya recently when its supreme court declared the presidential election null and void. In at least 21 African states, constitutions have been amended in order to extend the mandates of presidents. Political and civil rights – in particular the rights of opposition parties and civil society – are severely under threat. The latest example that hardly comes to attention in Europe is Tanzania – once a poster child for development assistance. The proposed panel seeks to discuss the state of democracy and latest developments with representatives from academia and think tanks (e.g. Afrobarometer), democracy support practitioners, representatives of donor agencies (e. g. EU Directorate-General for International Cooperation and Development, DEVCO), and African political actors. The leading question will be how to get Africa’s democratization processes back on track, how to support local initiatives, and how to give as an international or regional actor the right signals?

Time: Saturday, 30 June 2018, 8.30 - 10.30 am
Venue: Hörsaalgebäude, HS 7

Chair
Andrea Ostheimer (Kondrad-Adenauer-Stiftung, Berlin)

Discussants
Jakkie Cilliers (Institute for Security Studies, Pretoria, South Africa)
John Edward Mrema (Director for Communication, Chama cha Demokrasia na Maendeleo (CHADEMA), Tanzania)
Robert Mattes (School of Government and Public Policy, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland)
Yangu Kiakwama (Political Activist and Founding Member of Filimbi, Democratic Republic of the Congo)
José Fernando Costa Pereira (European External Action Service, Brussels, Belgium)

Andrea Ostheimer (Kondrad-Adenauer-Stiftung, Berlin)
RT 05
Abstract
When it comes to feminism, the fight for equal rights for women and sexual minorities, Africa is still seen as being at the receiving end of global changes. Be it in Western/Northern academic contributions, activist interventions, or political statements, Africa – just as the Global South more generally – is portrayed as patriarchal, traditionalist, homophobic, and the antidote to the progressive West/North when it comes to questions of gender and LGBTIQ*. What had already been pointed out by Chandra Mohanty in the late 1980s with regard to the Western feminist movement has gained a new prominence with the emergence of outspoken LGBTIQ* movements in the US and Europe: The projection of backwardness of African politics and the proclaimed lack of political emancipation of African women and sexual minorities strongly shapes the self-identity of Western/Northern politics as progressive and feminist/LGBTIQ* activists as the saviors of Third World women and gays.
At the same time, African political leaders are buying into the same logic from a different angle. Within a seemingly decolonial argumentation, homosexuality is portrayed as un-African and a Western import and African emancipation from Western/Northern interventions is more often than not spelled out first with regard to questions of gender and sexual identity.
Thus, in the Global North as well as in many African countries, Africa's own history of sexual diversity and feminist movements is being ignored, silenced, and unwritten. What is more, the importance of Afrofeminism and the manifold experiences of African gender and sexual identities for the development of feminism globally is completely sidelined.
This roundtable discussion aims to analyse not only the entanglements of sexual and gender norms, homophobia, and patriarchy in the Global North and Africa, but also the connections and interrelatedness of feminist and LGBTIQ* liberation struggles. How does Afrofeminism shape global feminism? How is the struggle for gender and sexual rights within Africa related to struggles of the African diaspora? What effects does a Western dominated global feminist movement have on African feminist movements and African politics? What can we learn from pan-African and South-South connections with regard to gender and sexual rights?

Time: Thursday, 28 June 2018, 11 am - 1 pm
New Venue: Seminargebäude, S 420

Chair
Peggy Piesche (Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung, Berlin)

Discussants
Zethu Matebeni (University of Cape Town, South Africa)
Nana Darkoa Sekyiamah (Association for Women’s Rights in Development, Accra, Ghana/London, UK)

Claudia Simons (Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung, Berlin)
RT 06
Abstract
This Round Table takes stock of recent developments in African Studies in Europe, Africa and other parts of the world, both with a view to new epistemological trends, but also with regard to the institutional and financial development of African Studies.

Time: Friday, 29 June 2018, 11 am - 1 pm
New Venue: Seminargebäude, S 420

Chair
Ulf Engel (Leipzig University)

Discussants
Clara Carvalho (University of Lisbon, Portugal)
Dieter Neubert (University of Bayreuth)
Linnéa Gelot (Folke Bernadotte Academy, Stockholm, Sweden)
Elísio Macamo (University of Basel, Switzerland)
Hana Horáková (Metropolitan University of Prague, Czech Republic)

Ulf Engel (Leipzig University)
RT 07
Abstract
Die internationale Politik ändert sich rasant – und wirkt sich auch auf den afrikanischen Kontinent aus. Neben der starken Präsenz Chinas und der Einbindung von Teilen Afrikas in die ‚neue Seidenstraße‘ hinterlassen auch andere Player ihre Spuren, von der Türkei bis zu den Vereinigten Arabischen Emiraten. In Deutschland selbst wiederum ist Migration zum Hauptthema auf der Afrika-Agenda der Bundesrepublik geworden. Diese und andere Themen diskutieren AfrikaexpertInnen in diesem Round table.

Time: Friday, 29 June 2018, 2 - 4 pm
New Venue: Seminargebäude, S 420

Chair
Andreas Mehler (Arnold Bergstraesser Institute, Freiburg i. Br.)

Discussants
Elísio Macamo (University of Basel, Switzerland)
Christof Hartmann (University of Duisburg-Essen)
Julia Leininger (German Development Institute, Bonn)
Robert Kappel (Leipzig University)

Ulf Engel (Leipzig University)